Surf Rodeo

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A two day Music and Surf Festival at Pierpont Beach and along Seaward Ave. in Ventura. Over twenty-five bands, a surf contest with a rodeo twist, Cornhole competition, beer gardens and live music right on the beach, and a street fair with all types of vendors. This is one heck of a beach party you won’t want to miss! Go to surfrodeo.org for more information

The New Thing: Tiny Houses

 

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
DIVISION OF CODES AND STANDARDS
2020 W. EI Camino Avenue, Suite 200, Sacramento, CA 95833
P.O. Box 1407, Sacramento, CA 95812-1407
(916) 445-9471/ FAX (916) 263-5348
From TOO Phones 1-800-735-2929
www.hcd.ca.gov

February 4, 2016
INFORMATION BUllETIN 2016-01 (MH, FBH, SHl, MP/SOP, RT, Ol)
TO: City and County Building Officials
Mobilehome and Special Occupancy Park Enforcement Agencies
Division Staff
SUBJECT: TINY HOMES

This Information Bulletin is intended to clarify the legality of use, design and construction approval of any residential structure that may be commonly referred to as a tiny home. Currently, neither the Department of Housing and Community Development (“HCD”) nor any other state or local agency has specific statutory or regulatory definition authority of construction approval for tiny homes as a specialty product. These structures, which may range anywhere from 80 to 400 square feet in size, may be built with a variety of standards or no construction standards; may or may not be constructed on a chassis (with or without axles or wheels); and are usually offered for use and placement in a variety of sites. It is the purpose of this Information Bulletin to describe when a tiny home fits the definition of one of the following: recreational vehicle (including park trailer), manufactured home, factory-built housing, or a site-constructed California Building Standards Code dwelling and therefore would be legal to occupy.

As residential structures, tiny homes must receive one of several types of state or local government approvals prior to occupancy, depending on the design of the structure and the location of its installation. While HCD supports efforts to make housing more affordable and efficient, state laws mandate that residential structures meet state standards. Failure to comply with these statutory requirements results in the tiny home being a noncomplying residential structure in which occupancy is illegal and is subject to punitive action by the appropriate enforcement agency, including the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”).

In order to be occupied, a tiny home must comply with the standards of, and be approved as one of the following types of structures:

  1. a HUD-Code manufactured home (“MH”),
  2. California Residential Code or California Building Code home (“CRC” or “CBC”),
  3. factory-built housing (“FBH”),
  4. recreational vehicle (“RV”),
  5. park trailer (“PT”) or
  6. camping cabin (“CC”).

The approving agency will vary depending upon whether the tiny home is located inside or outside of a mobilehome park or special occupancy park…

RVs manufactured on or after July 14, 2005, must be constructed in accordance with the NFPA 1192 standard. Compliance with these standards can be determined by an owner-provided label or insignia similar to those issued by the Recreational Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA) that is permanently affixed to the RV. However, an insignia issued exclusively by RVIA is not required (HSC §18027.3). For more information regarding RVIA certification, see http://www.rvia.org/.

Unless otherwise allowed by a local ordinance, RVs generally may be occupied only in
mobilehome parks or special occupancy parks governed by the Mobilehome Parks Act (“MPA”).

Enforcement and Prosecution
If a structure called a tiny home or similar name is sold, offered for sale, leased, rented or occupied as a residential structure which does not comply with the standards for any of the units described above, the enforcement authority having appropriate jurisdiction (as described above) is responsible for pursuing the appropriate legal remedies to terminate the sales, rentals or occupancies. The enforcement agency may initiate actions under the authorities listed previously and/or any other authority it has to abate the sale or occupancy of unpermitted structures including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Prohibiting occupancy if the nonconforming structure violates local land use laws or violates any state or local public health, safety, fire, or similar authorities.
  • Prohibiting the manufacture, sale, lease, rental or use in California.
  • Mandating correction of any violations of applicable laws and regulations of a unit sold, leased, rented or occupied in California.

If you have any questions regarding tiny homes as they relate to this Information Bulletin, please contact the Manufactured Housing Program at (916) 445-3338 or by email to either Cesar.Ponce@hcd.ca.gov or MitcheI.Baker@hcd.ca.gov.

Read the full notice: http://files.ctctcdn.com/4d29178d401/ddccfe12-c56f-48cf-8ed9-8bbec86bb521.pdf

Should You Buy A Bigger House?

Should You Buy A Bigger House?

Even though many people are buying less expensive housing these days, you might be very tempted to buy a bigger house. I can understand that. Interest rates are ridiculously low and real estate prices seem to be just bottoming out. I recently wrote a post explaining that most people are far better off buying real estate rather than renting. I believe that with every cell of my body. If that is true, wouldn’t it also be true that owning more real estate (in the form of a larger house) is better than owning less? The argument has merit.

But before you whip out your check book and call Moshe’s Movers, chill out. Even ifyou can af ford the new house, I suggest you pause. While there are a few good reasons to move into larger digs, there are plenty of reasons why you should maintain as small a footprint as possible.

Reasons to Move to a Larger Home

There are only three good reasons to move into a larger home:

1. Current Home Way too Small

One of the worst decisions I ever made was to buy a house that was really affordable but way too small for our family. My wife tried to tell me this before we bought the house. But of course the financial advisor expert in me took over and prevailed. Within a year we all agreed that we better move before one of us ends up on the 5 o’clock news.

That was very expensive because real estate prices had increased over that year and of course we had to pay the commissions and the movers and all that fun stuff. Drag. If you are in a house that doesn’t fit your family and you can afford a bigger house, I suggest you do it. Now is a great time for you to upgrade.

2. Current Home Way too Far

Just like living in a cramped space, living in a bad location can be a downer. If you are moving anyway, why not trade up a little? Again, assuming you can afford the upgrade, go for it. No reason why you shouldn’t.

3. Extra Costs of New Home Are Irrelevant

If you want a bigger home because you want a bigger home and you can easily pay the higher freight, it might be OK to go for it. This can be really tricky however.

One of my friends bought a huge house overlooking the valley when he was at the peak of his career. He spent a ton of money on a huge mansion and was very happy there – for a while.

Eventually he decided that he wanted to change his lifestyle. He realized that if he downsized, he could actually retire early and live very comfortably. Unfortunately, he hasn’t been able to realize his dream. The house is worth much less now than when he bought it. As a result, he’s stuck with the larger house, the very high upkeep and a lifestyle he’s dying to change.

To summarize, there are only 3 reasons you should buy a bigger home. Notice that I didn’t include buying a larger estate as a way to increase your real estate investments. While I do think it’s generally a good time to invest in property, the best way to do this is by owning rentals in the right market. Rentals provide income. Your residence doesn’t. Buying a bigger house as an investment might work out for you but it’s far riskier than buying good rentals.

Why You Should Not Buy a Bigger Home

1. You Can’t Afford It

Never buy a house you can’t easily afford. With the uncertain financial times we live in, it’s not unheard of to suffer big financial reversals. If heaven forbid you encounter such a situation (such as losing your job), the last thing you want to do is to lose your house too. People underestimate what it really costs to own a home. When you upgrade to a larger house all of the following bills go up substantially:

a. Mortgage Payments (duh)
b. Insurance
c. Taxes
d. Utilities
e. Upkeep
f. Décor and Furnishings (You’ll probably have to buy all new furniture when you move. At the very least, you’ll have to buy more furniture to fill up that castle you just bought).
g. Landscaping and grounds

Even if you think you can afford the new house please confirm it. Take a few minutes and crunch the numbers to be sure.

2. Risk

As I mentioned above, once you commit to real estate – especially if it’s your residence – it’s difficult and expensive to make a change. Consider how your circumstances might change over the years ahead.

Think of my friend who wanted to reinvent his life but couldn’t because he was trapped by the large home he owned and couldn’t sell.

My wife and I bought a pretty nice house in LA when our kids were younger. Before we knew it, 2 of them were in college and out of the house. We really don’t need that big house any more. I’m not saying it was a mistake to buy the house originally (12 years ago) but it would be a mistake for us to buy a bigger house now.

This is true even though it would be easier for us to afford a larger home now that two of the kids are almost done with college. There is no reason for us to buy a larger home so we aren’t doing so. Having a very affordable home gives us lots of freedom and peace of mind.

3. Opportunity Cost

If you tie up lots of money in your residence you incur an opportunity cost. The money you put in as a down payment is money you can’t invest elsewhere. Maybe there are better alternatives that you can’t take advantage of because you haven’t got the scratch. And remember that more of your monthly income goes towards the house payment. That’s money you can’t invest for your retirement. It’s also money you can’t use to travel or have fun doing other things with.

Real estate presents a wonderful opportunity right now. I’m a big fan. If you are thinking of taking advantage of the present circumstances to buy a larger home, it could be a really smart move. Just make sure you do this with your eyes wide open and do it for the right reasons.

Are you thinking of buying a larger home now? Why or why not?

Farmers Market

-Oxnard

Every Thursday,

Open year round, the market offers an enormous variety of freshest local fruits and produce available as well as freshly prepared items such as bread, dried fruits, nuts, and more.

Location: Plaza park, 500 S. C St.,

Information: 805.247.0197

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Readers Choice 2016

Have You voted yet? Go vote now for your favorite things about Ventura. Help us at Berkshire Hathaway be the top voted Real estate Brokerage  In ventura! Thank you all for making Ventura such a wonderful place to live!

Readers Choice

 

 

691 Aliso st. New Price!

             Hillside retreat just blocks from the ocean! Spacious single level home with 4 bedrooms and almost 2,700 square feet. Large living room with grand fireplace. Remodeled kitchen with open concept family room complete with fireplace and wet bar! Formal dining room leads out to the private patio. Master suite has 2 closets, sunken spa tub, separate shower and private patio. The only steps are to the garage and indoor laundry room. This home is centrally located close to downtown Ventura and the beach. Don't miss this opportunity to live in such an exclusive hillside neighborhood!

The Dream Home
The Dream Home

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices #1 in Brand Equity

Based upon a “pure ranking” of a sample of real estate brands, the 2014 Harris Poll EquiTrend ranked Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices with the highest numerical “equity score” among real estate brands.

Other real estate brands to rank high, but below Berkshire Hathaway, in the poll’s “Real Estate Agency” category were Century 21 Real Estate, Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate, Keller Williams Realty and Prudential Real Estate.

Brands that fell below average in the real estate category wereColdwell Banker Real Estate, ERA Real Estate, Re/Max, Sotheby’s International Realty and Weichert Realtors.

Read the full article here: www.inman.com